"Live a good life, and in the end, it’s not the years in the life, it’s the life in the years."

A place I could call…

By on December 20, 2018 in Columnist with 0 Comments

Mike CassidyBy Mike Cassidy

Editor

Cassidyville?

Cassidyburg?

The Land of Cassidy?

Excuse me, but I am just trying out a few names should I get the chance to name a town after… well, me.

Unfortunately, in these modern times, most towns are already named, and not too many are starting fresh, in need of a designation.

That’s a shame, because think Cassidytropolis — there’s a name destined for greatness.

I started playing with town names after reading Rod Molzahn’s history article this month about north central Washington pioneer Ernst Wagner. It’s an incredible story of determination and grit, and his refusal to give in to setbacks.

Rod concluded his story by writing: “(Wagner) retired from the international market in 1919 but continued to develop the orchards at Wagnersburg,”

“Wait,” I said in an email to Rod, “I’ve never heard of Wagnersburg. Where’s that at?”

So Rod enlightened me with the following story:

“Wagnersburg is about halfway between Wenatchee and Entiat on the Columbia River. There is a Great Northern siding there that the railroad people named Stayman (an apple variety).

“Ernst didn’t like the name. Since it was on his land he went east to talk with Louis Hill (J.J.’s son and president of the Great Northern.) Louis and Ernst were friends.

“Ernst told Louis he didn’t like the name and Louis asked him what he preferred. Ernst said he wanted it called Wagnersburg. Louis got on the phone and called someone who had the name changed by the time Ernst got home.”

Now, that’s a story of a person who deserved to have a place — even if it’s just a railroad siding — named after him.

See Rod’s story on page 36.

An alert reader — thank you retired Forest Service Plant Ecologist Terry Lillybridge — pointed out the photo we ran last month in Jaana Hatton’s Meet Our Native Plants column was incorrect.

“I like the articles that Jaana Hatton does in The Good Life.  They are nicely written and informative. However, in her latest article on Oceanspray, the photo displayed is that of Clematis ligusticifolia  (Western Virgins-bower) and not that of Holodiscus discolor (Oceanspray).”

Oops! To make matters right, here is an actual photo of Oceanspray:

Oceanspray

 

Be the mayor of your own destiny — enjoy The Good Life.

— Mike

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